Intercultural Lifestyle Magazine
Home

Fashion & Lifestyle        

Fashion News -->

Topics
Education
Career
Money
Health
Fashion & Lifestyle
Sport & fitness
Dating & Love
Sexuality
Family
Women & Men
Intercultural
Entertainment
Travel & Adventure
Hobbies
Spirituality
Food & Drinks
Stories
World News
Horoscopes
Books
Features
Science
Technology
Management
Philosophy
Politics
Arts
Humor & Jokes
Forums
Sarah Forum
Info
About Us
Editor's Letter
Submit Your Article
Register Now
Advertising
Links
Afritopic
Our Partners
 
 
Christian Lacroix's Fashion Show
Christian Lacroix's couture is the quintessence of a certain palate-zinging taste that's unique to Paris. He lays on a visual feast that co-opts the draped grandeur of Edwardian gowns, the boudoir fragility of empire negligees, the richness of Spanish costume, and the eccentric side of the ladylike sixties.It's a rich mix indeed, especially when served up with puffy leg-o'-mutton sleeves, diamanté brooches
Christian Lacroix's design
 
the size of saucers, lashings of ribbons, and clouds of frosted cotton-candied headgear. And if that sounds like too much to take in one sitting, this collection was actually, to seasoned Lacroix-watchers, a calmer affair than usual, concentrating more on volume and color than his usual grande-bouffe decorative excess

These clothes are best savored one by one. Take a gold-embroidered lace coat, trimmed with fur over a matching dress. Or a shell-pink, jet-beaded toreador bolero over a twisted geranium-red chiffon gown. Or a purple ombré-painted puffy Poiret coat over a ruffled, smocked pink mini tank dress. None of these bear any thematic relation to one another, save their outstanding individuality. They are for women capable of carrying off both whimsy and boldness, and that's a version of Parisian sophistication that's only ever on the menu at Lacroix's table.

by Sarah Mower 

 
Google
Web www.sarahmagazine.com
 
 
 
 
 
Elie Saab's Fashion Show
"I wanted to do forties Hollywood—and late-seventies glamour," said Elie Saab, the Beirut-based designer who is building up a red-carpet profile for himself in both Paris and Los Angeles. His instinct for the right trend, plus the fact that the couture schedule now has a hole in it where Donatella Versace used to show, made his parade of va-va-voom drama-dresses worth scrutinizing. Saab's best looks were pale, sparkling, silver-beaded numbers constructed to hug the body at the crucial points and then trail glamorously to the floor. Together with one forties suit made entirely of gold sequins, they successfully evoked George Hurrell's classic portraits of Jean Harlow and Joan Crawford.
 
Elie Saab's design
Though not exactly made for shrinking violets, this season's dresses showed more decorum than some of the semi-naked, multiprinted frocks Saab has unveiled before—a step in the right direction, now that fashion is in the mood for a little more dignity. (Though adding leggings—or jumpsuit devices—under some sheer dresses might have been taking modesty a little too seriously.) With his love of color, as well as silver-screen glam, Saab shows signs of increasing sophistication. He'll never cut it as a cerebral creator, but as a custom dressmaker, he can give New Hollywood, as well as the princesses of the Arab world, just what they want.

by Sarah Mower 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 <Home              top> 

Terms of Use

copyright ©2002-2003 sarahmagazine.com